‘Rampant Lawlessness’: how ‘radical’ is breaking unjust laws?

‘Rampant Lawlessness’: how ‘radical’ is breaking unjust laws?

Comments in March by Sally McManus, Secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), about breaking unjust laws (ABC’s 7:30 Report, 15/3/17) stirred quite a reaction. Here is what she said:

I believe in the rule of law where the law is fair and the law is right. But when it’s unjust, I don’t think there’s a problem with breaking it.

Christopher Pyne, Liberal frontbencher and Leader of the House, responded by saying that McManus’s comments were ‘the kind of anarcho-Marxist claptrap we used to hear from anarchists at Adelaide University in the 1980s’.

Re-enchanting creation – reflections on Monbiot’s ‘Forget “the environment”’

Re-enchanting creation – reflections on Monbiot’s ‘Forget “the environment”’

George Monbiot calls for a new language when talking about the environment. Christians have a rich vocabulary and narrative to bring to the table: creation as God's temple, creation as our neighbour and humans as His image-bearers - not merely Homo Economicus, but also Homo Spiritualis.

A Tale of Two Gileads: legalism and grace in the eyes of Atwood and Robinson

A Tale of Two Gileads: legalism and grace in the eyes of Atwood and Robinson

The Handmaid’s Tale’s futuristic assault on fundamentalism has a biblical background. It is derived from Genesis 30:3, where one of many sad tales of patriarchal and matriarchal infertility and sibling rivalry, threatening the Abrahamic promise of a great people like sand and star-studied sky, is played out a week’s walk or ride from the hill country of Gilead (Gen 31:23). Jacob the deceiver gets deceived by his father-in-law Laban to unknowingly marry her older sister Leah, unveiled after consummation. Seven more years labour to gain the beautiful but barren Rachel’s hand, he impregnates, to satisfy his wife Rachel’s desperate desire for a child, her handmaid Bilhah, her ample abdomen apparently nestled onto Rachel’s knees for the birth, not the conception as in the TV series.

Harmony in Diversity interviewed Gordon Preece, Director of RASP, on euthanasia and end of life choices

Norm Currie from Harmony in Diversity hosted Gordon Preece to discuss the new Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy and the recent public conversation about euthanasia and end of life choices.

In August the Victorian Labour government proposes to introduce legislation enabling Voluntary Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in Victoria. This is a very significant issue deserving considered public discussion, the kind of opportunity that RASP (www.centrerasp.org) exists to promote.

On 29 June RASP hosted a public conversation between world-renowned bioethicists Professor Peter Singer (Princeton University and the University of Melbourne) & Professor Margaret Somerville (University of Notre Dame, Sydney and formerly McGill University, Montreal).

Revd Dr Gordon Preece, Director of RASP, introducing the new Centre and discussing RASP's recent public conversation about Euthanasia.
Uploaded by harmonyindiversity on 2017-07-21.

Revd Dr Gordon Preece, Director of RASP, on Euthanasia.
Uploaded by harmonyindiversity on 2017-07-21.