Harmony in Diversity interviewed Gordon Preece, Director of RASP, on euthanasia and end of life choices

Norm Currie from Harmony in Diversity hosted Gordon Preece to discuss the new Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy and the recent public conversation about euthanasia and end of life choices.

In August the Victorian Labour government proposes to introduce legislation enabling Voluntary Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in Victoria. This is a very significant issue deserving considered public discussion, the kind of opportunity that RASP (www.centrerasp.org) exists to promote.

On 29 June RASP hosted a public conversation between world-renowned bioethicists Professor Peter Singer (Princeton University and the University of Melbourne) & Professor Margaret Somerville (University of Notre Dame, Sydney and formerly McGill University, Montreal).

Revd Dr Gordon Preece, Director of RASP, introducing the new Centre and discussing RASP's recent public conversation about Euthanasia.
Uploaded by harmonyindiversity on 2017-07-21.

Revd Dr Gordon Preece, Director of RASP, on Euthanasia.
Uploaded by harmonyindiversity on 2017-07-21.

Euthanasia: Some theological considerations for living responsibly

Euthanasia: Some theological considerations for living responsibly

This article articulates some of the main arguments both for and against euthanasia under the circumstances being envisaged by the Victorian Parliament’s Legal and Social Issues Committee. More particularly, its concern is to attend to some of the theological issues germane to the subject. To this end, it identifies and discusses six arguments for and six arguments against legalizing voluntary euthanasia. It concludes with an appeal to the economy of the divine life as the most responsible lens through which the Christian community thinks about and engages with this issue.

Faith

Faith

The question of assisted dying is raw and emotional, based on a very natural human fear, and there are few ethical questions of our time in which reason and evidence have played such a minor role.

Advocates on both sides are mostly guided by the highest motives, and both can point to horror stories, but I don't want to take that line.

My objections are based on human values which most non-believers share.

The argument that irks me is that "religion" is denying people the autonomy to choose their own death.

I am a Christian, and I oppose the legislation, but not for religious reasons. I have a high regard for the sanctity of human life, but I can imagine the outrage if I suggested only religious people valued life. And I don't suggest it.

My objections are based on human values which most non-believers share.

Vocation Should Not Be a Middle-Class Luxury

Vocation Should Not Be a Middle-Class Luxury

Gordon Preece is an Anglican minister, the director of Ethos: Evangelical Alliance Centre for Christianity & Society, and the founding director of RASP, the Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy of the University of Divinity, all in Victoria, Australia. The Green Room talked to him as part of an ongoing series of interviews with leaders of faith and work ministries.

TGR: How did you first become involved in faith and work ministry?

GP: I could, and I think theologically should, say through working in my father’s concrete products & home improvements business as a teenager. It’s there that I realised there was a difference between the largely working class people who worked for Dad and the middle class Presbyterians where I attended church. They were a bit rough in some ways: swearing, girlie posters on the walls.