Vocation Should Not Be a Middle-Class Luxury

Vocation Should Not Be a Middle-Class Luxury

Gordon Preece is an Anglican minister, the director of Ethos: Evangelical Alliance Centre for Christianity & Society, and the founding director of RASP, the Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy of the University of Divinity, all in Victoria, Australia. The Green Room talked to him as part of an ongoing series of interviews with leaders of faith and work ministries.

TGR: How did you first become involved in faith and work ministry?

GP: I could, and I think theologically should, say through working in my father’s concrete products & home improvements business as a teenager. It’s there that I realised there was a difference between the largely working class people who worked for Dad and the middle class Presbyterians where I attended church. They were a bit rough in some ways: swearing, girlie posters on the walls.

The Logical Slippery Slope: Euthanasia & Assisted Suicide in Victoria

The Logical Slippery Slope: Euthanasia & Assisted Suicide in Victoria

The euthanasia physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia (PAS-E) debate involves a conflict between respect for individual autonomy and respect for human life. Pro-PAS advocates give priority to autonomy, anti-PAS-E adherents to respect for life.

Pro PAS-E argue PAS-E are medical treatments, just extensions of palliative care. Anti PAS-E disagree seeing doctors killing patients or helping them to kill themselves as a seismic disruption of our foundational societal values and a radical change in the ethos of medicine.

Many pro PAS-E people argue PAS-E concerns only the individual. Anti PAS-E point out that legalising euthanasia raises wide-ranging major issues for medicine and law, for practitioners of these two professions, and for all of us as families, communities and a society.

Why I Support Voluntary Assisted Dying

Why I Support Voluntary Assisted Dying

The Victorian government’s proposed legislation would allow doctors to act on patients’ requests for prescription drugs that, should they choose to take them, would bring about their peaceful death.

Similar legislation has existed in the American state of Oregon for 20 years, and in neighbouring Washington for 8 years.  More recently, California, Vermont and Colorado have followed Oregon’s example, as has Canada. Some European countries also permit doctors to help patients to end their lives. 

The details of the legislation vary. In Oregon, doctors must state that the patient has less than six months to live.  In The Netherlands it is sufficient if the patient has an incurable condition that is, in the patient’s view, causing unbearable suffering.  There are also other safeguards, including a requirement for a second medical opinion, a certification that the patient is of sound mind and competent to make decisions, and a cooling off period after which the patient must make a second request before the prescription can be supplied.