Martha Nussbaum Faces Our Fears

Martha Nussbaum Faces Our Fears

Martin E. Marty

divinity.uchicago.edu | 16 July 2018

Martha Nussbaum has famously written about the cultural and societal effects of various emotions. Recently, she has dealt perceptively with theological accounts of fear and its role in stimulating anger and violence, forces which “religious” people can all too frequently manipulate.

Why Australians’ religious freedom is worth protecting

Why Australians’ religious freedom is worth protecting

Denis Dragovic

theconversation.com | 18 July 2018

Research shows that religion can have a positive impact on society in terms of better health, less crime and a stronger economy. This research suggests that we need to consider carefully the possible consequences of losing religion from the public square in Australia.

Grattan on Friday: Little upside for Malcolm Turnbull in debate over religious freedom

Grattan on Friday: Little upside for Malcolm Turnbull in debate over religious freedom

Michelle Grattan

theconversation.com | 12 July 2018

There is no credible reason to believe the opportunity for religious views to be put on various issues will be stifled in the future. Talk of a Religious Discrimination Act would trigger calls for a wider bill of rights – somewhere the government won’t be going. And there is always a risk with such legislation of unintended consequences – witness the fallout around some terms in the Racial Discrimination Act’s section 18C.

How Facebook Is Transforming Religion

How Facebook Is Transforming Religion

A. Trevor Sutton

divinity.uchicago.edu | 12 July 2018

Facebook (and perhaps Silicon Valley as a whole) is reflecting on the impact and influence its technology has on society. Facebook is considering how its tools are used both individually and collectively. Facebook is spending time contemplating its navel. Through all of this, Facebook is asking questions that have to do with technological determinism. But what impact do digital technologies have on religious belief?

"Kill the Indian in the Child"

"Kill the Indian in the Child"

Martin E. Marty

divinity.uchicago.edu | 2 July 2018

'The priest adds: “It was actually the theology that was violent … We need to look at the theology that blinded us and prevented us from seeing.” The “root sin” in the residential school system — which “made everything else possible” — “was the lie that European and Christian culture was superior to First Nations’ cultures.” May this Canadian story be helpful to anyone who would cherish the truth that people should be free wherever, and under whatever tribal names or religious auspices, they live.'

The Western Crack-Up

The Western Crack-Up

Javier Solana

socialeurope.eu | 27 June 2018

The "West” is itself a vague concept. But it is one that rests on a set of common ideological pillars, which are now crumbling under the weight of US President Donald Trump’s “America First” agenda. Trump’s preference for a divide-and-rule strategy produces a game that will create only losers, beginning with the West and ending with the world at large.

The Postures Of Public Justice

The Postures Of Public Justice

Kyle David Bennett

cpjustice.org | June 2018

The increasing hostility in our everyday interactions didn’t happen overnight: A self-centered and broken culture has formed us to roll our eyes, shrug our shoulders, grit our teeth, clench our fists, and look at our phone as a way to escape our neighbor. What if we treated this hostile posture as a matter of justice, as a matter of what others are due?

Christianity Today Reviews "Redeeming Capitalism" by Dr. Ken Barnes: Imagining a Virtuous Capitalism

Christianity Today Reviews "Redeeming Capitalism" by Dr. Ken Barnes: Imagining a Virtuous Capitalism

Hugh C. Welchel

gordonconwell.edu | 22 June 2018

In his new book, Redeeming Capitalism, Kenneth J. Barnes does not insist on unfettered capitalism; nor does he want to scrap capitalism for an “alternative economic utopia". Instead, Barnes proposes “that capitalism, once rooted in a particular religious ethic, long since lost to the moral relativism of the modern era, need not be replaced, but needs instead to be redeemed".

Tim Winton: 'Being called a misogynist stings a bit'

Tim Winton: 'Being called a misogynist stings a bit'

Gay Alcorn

theguardian.com | 26 June 2018

Perhaps Winton is damned if he talks about feminism and damned if he doesn’t. Perhaps he will never say quite the right thing, even though his is a powerful and popular voice. Perhaps it irks some women that he wants to talk about how misogyny is a sign of something wrong in masculinity – although he is at pains to point out that its primary victims are women.