Of murderers, bastards and inequality: neo-liberalism's failure

Of murderers, bastards and inequality: neo-liberalism's failure

Andrew Hamilton

eurekastreet.com.au | 15 August 2017

Cometh the hour, cometh the third murderer. So now inequality is in the spotlight and is being booed off the stage. It is blamed for the rise of populist politics, and more fundamentally for economic stagnation. The economic neo-liberal orthodoxy, that so implausibly claimed that economic competition unfettered by government regulation would benefit all of the citizens, has produced the gross inequality that hinders economic growth.

Melbourne archbishop says he'd rather go to jail than report child abuse heard in confession

Melbourne archbishop says he'd rather go to jail than report child abuse heard in confession

Melissa Davey

theguardian.com | 15 August 2017

The archbishop of the archdiocese of Melbourne, Denis Hart, said he would risk going to jail rather than report allegations of child sexual abuse raised during confession, and that the sacredness of communication with God during confession should be above the law.

 

Religious visibility, disadvantage and bridging social capital: a comparative investigation of multicultural localities in Melbourne’s north

Religious visibility, disadvantage and bridging social capital: a comparative investigation of multicultural localities in Melbourne’s north

Val Colic-Peisker & Karien Dekker

rmit.edu.au | 2017

People living in more diverse suburbs are less likely to express or experience Islamophobia, according to new RMIT research. The study confirms the suggestion of the ‘contact theory’: that direct social interaction with minority groups leads to the diminishing of prejudice against them”. Assoc. Prof. Val Colic-Peisker said. Muslims who liked their suburbs, interacted with their diverse neighbours and felt accepted and safe in their local areas had a positive experience. However, ‘visible’ Muslim women often felt at risk outside their suburbs, where there was a higher likelihood of Islamophobic incidents, with public transport being identified as a threatening setting for Muslim women.

A Quebec ‘mercy killing’ prompts a rethink on euthanasia law

A Quebec ‘mercy killing’ prompts a rethink on euthanasia law

Michael Cook

bioedge.org | 12 August 2017

Even though Canada allows euthanasia (and Quebec also has its own law), a patient has to be legally competent in order to lodge a request for “medical aid-in-dying”. Touched by the drama of Michel Cadotte case, Quebec legislators are considering a change in legislation to allow people to make binding advance directives for euthanasia before they slip into dementia. But Dr Catherine Ferrier, the president of the Physicians’ Alliance against Euthanasia, says proper care for caregivers, not the broadening of euthanasia laws, is the answer.

This is Not About the Postal Vote

This is Not About the Postal Vote

Stephen McAlpine

stephenmcalpine.com | 12 August 2017

Regardless of what your view is about same sex marriage, the moment it is enacted - or at least after the confetti has settled and the party is over - is the moment we see if our religious freedom laws are strong enough to ensure that dissenting voices can continue to dissent publicly without fear of retribution on the other side of the marriage decision, writes Stephen McAlpine.

Why I changed my mind on marriage equality

Why I changed my mind on marriage equality

Robyn Whitaker

smh.com.au | 8 August 2017

I could not imagine two people of the same gender getting married, I had seen no model of it and I had limited experience of LGBTI people. I am now a supporter of marriage equality, not despite my faith but precisely because my Christian faith demands that I treat others with compassion, justice, and love. So what changed my mind?

The risk of a transhumanist future

The risk of a transhumanist future

Xavier Symons

bioedge.org | 5 August 2017

Sociologist Alex Thomas of East London University believes that transhumanism will further enforce a societal obsession with “progress” and “efficiency” at the expense of social justice and environmental sustainability. He argues that, rather than assisting humanity, these technologies could potentially lead to a “mechanisation” of humanity and facilitate a subtle form of authoritarian control.

The empty moral calculus of Turnbull and Trump

The empty moral calculus of Turnbull and Trump

Andrew Hamilton

eurekastreet.com.au | 9 August 2017

In the Turnbull-Trump tapes, we see two men bargaining, but with little dignity. Here no universal moral order is in place. There are only local political imperatives. There is no consideration of value, only of control and expediency. There is no appeal to truth, only of the need to maintain appearances.

Social Media and the SSM Plebiscite: a how to guide

Social Media and the SSM Plebiscite: a how to guide

Megan Powell du Toit

ethos.org.au | 10 August 2017

How you handle the public debate around the marriage plebiscite will affect your relationships, your ability to be heard when you talk about your faith, and how people view the church. Above all, it will affect people in the community for whom this is personal. Here are some tips on how to engage in a thoughtful, Christlike manner.

Interview: Lydia S. Dugdale on death and dying

Interview: Lydia S. Dugdale on death and dying

Lydia S. Dugdale

bioedge.org | 4 August 2017

Current approaches to dying maintain the cleanliness, nutrition and medical care of patients, but the medical industry are not sufficient to address the existential questions that matter to so many patients. In this regard, we have much to learn from the ars moriendi (Latin for “art of dying”) tradition with its focus on the lifelong preparation for death.