The Achievement of James H. Cone

The Achievement of James H. Cone

Dwight N. Hopkins

divinity.uchicago.edu | 24 May 2018

James Hal Cone (died 28th April 2018) taught us how the gospel of Jesus is for the poor and the oppressed, the bruised and the wounded, and that the mission and message of the gospel is not antithetical to but is the essence of liberation. Cone’s theology has forever changed the course of pedagogy, international relations, institutions of all faiths, governmental debates and inter-generational legacies.

Jimmy Carter (and Hope) in the News

Jimmy Carter (and Hope) in the News

Martin E. Marty

divinity.uchicago.edu | 14 May 2018

Carter the then-Southern Baptist was properly, but briefly, applauded by evangelicals as one of their own. But all that was back when evangelicals were still lowercase-“e” evangelicals, before millions of them capitalized on their newfound cultural and political visibility with new typography — Evangelicalism with a capital “E” — and became a virtual political party, or at least provided the base for one.

Homelessness: Australia’s shameful story of policy complacency and failure continues

Homelessness: Australia’s shameful story of policy complacency and failure continues

Hal Pawson and Cameron Parsell

theconversation.com | 15 May 2018

A decade after the launch of a national campaign against homelessness, the trends are all going the wrong way. A new annual report highlights what's gone wrong and what must be done.

Does working with money make us worse people?

Does working with money make us worse people?

Gordon Menzies

theguardian.com | 7 May 2018

We’ve all heard the maxim that “money is the root of all evil” (actually a misquote from the Bible). It’s fallen out of favour in an age of neoliberalism, but a sense of the potentially sinister power of money is making a comeback in psychology studies. So maybe the participants in the royal commission’s headlights couldn’t help themselves.

Now can Anzac Day return to a day of solemn reflection?

Now can Anzac Day return to a day of solemn reflection?

Paul Daley

theguardian.com | 25 April 2018

This is my Australia. It’s a country whose reconciliation, whose true identity, will be determined by our capacity to look inward, by self-reflection, in order to parse the critical things that happened right here. But it remains, sadly, a country afraid to embrace the breadth of its history, the noble and the horrific, a country that clings to 1788 and Anzac at the expense of too much else.

Marilynne Robinson’s Celebration of Humanity Is Brilliant but Incomplete

Marilynne Robinson’s Celebration of Humanity Is Brilliant but Incomplete

Wesley Hill

christianitytoday.com | 6 April 2018

Marilynne Robinson seems much less interested in theology for its own sake than in theology for the sake of anthropology. Her celebration of humanity needs to be qualified with an emphasis on humanity’s fallenness. Indeed, laying more stress on human depravity might actually advance, rather than detract from, the humanism she wants to promote.

Remembering shared humanity on Anzac Day

Remembering shared humanity on Anzac Day

Andrew Hamilton

eurekastreet.com.au | 22 April 2018

The tension between remembering those who died and celebrating those who fought makes the celebration of Anzac Day inherently controversial. It is seen by many to canonise military values. But the risk is less to glorify war than to sanitise it by allowing time and space to take away its physical reality and, with it, the sadness of war.

Martin Luther King Jr’s teachings ‘still relevant’ 50 years after his murder

Martin Luther King Jr’s teachings ‘still relevant’ 50 years after his murder

Conor Duffy

thenewdaily.com.au | 4 April 2018

Has America has reached a point where people are judged on the content of their character, rather than the colour of their skin, as her father famously dreamed? Conor Duffy speaks with Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther King.